The Heat Is On at Market Harborough

The Project: Council Offices, Market Harborough

M&E Contractor: Derry Building Services Ltd

The Heating Solution: Cocoon LST

The Detail:

Originally opened in 1983 and nestled in the historic Leicestershire town of Market Harborough the Symington Building houses the local library, town museum and Harborough District Council offices.

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After careful consideration the building underwent a £5.7 million complete refurbishment to revitalise the council offices creating a more modern work environment and to improve the library and museum services. This upgrade included relocating and extending the building as well as replacing the entire heating system.

Due to the building being completely open to the public the first and foremost consideration of Derry Building Services Ltd was the need for safe heating.  “We needed to find radiators that ensured any employees with disabilities or members of the public that were visiting the library or museum would not accidentally come into contact with a hot surface, which could be the case with traditional steel panel radiators” commented Jason Turner, Mechanical Design Engineer, Derry Building Services.

Additionally due to the intended ‘industrial’ look of the space all surfaces were going to be exposed and on view therefore meaning placement of the radiators was very important. It was finally decided that to keep the design balance throughout the offices a radiator was to be installed beneath each window requiring the radiators not only to be safe but within specified sizes that would still achieve the right output.

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However with the original single glazing of the building being retained this meant that the required heat output was very high. “The office space has multiple windows which is a great source of natural light but results in heat loss through the glass. We needed a heating system that would compensate for this heat loss by providing a high output but could still fit perfectly within the space beneath the windows,” explained Jason. “Additionally all of these requirements still needed to fit within a specific budget.”

Derry Building Services has previously worked on several successful projects with Jaga and knew that they offer high-efficiency Low Surface Temperature (LST) heating solutions with powerful outputs in compact sizes.  The Jaga Cocoon LST radiator ticked all the boxes and Derry had over 200 installed throughout the library, museum and council offices.

“As this was an older building the heat losses can be quite high so it was crucial that the system was able to combat this and still be as energy-efficient as possible,” said Jason. With only one tenth of the weight and water content of a traditional steel panel radiator the Cocoon LST’s powerful Low-H2O element offers rapid yet regulated heating at a reaction time that is three times faster than the performance of an ordinary radiator. “The Jaga Cocoon was one of the few LST radiators on the market that met all of these requirements.”

It was also important for the radiator to be aesthetically pleasing and clean-cut in design. “While we are not architects or interior designers we like to achieve high quality good looking results” said Jason Turner. “The Cocoon’s slim-line design means it is sophisticated and unobtrusive in all spaces which is important when such a large number are installed.”

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Finally the Cocoon LST casing goes all the way to the floor ensuring all the pipework is enclosed reducing the risk of burns and providing that neat and finished appearance.

Jaga Heating Products
Tel: 01531 631533
Fax: 01531 631534
E-mail: jaga@jaga.co.uk

http://www.jaga.co.uk

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Kirsty Hammond

SpecifierReview.com - The Building Products News Resource for Specifiers

One thought on “The Heat Is On at Market Harborough

  • February 17, 2014 at 3:38 pm
    Permalink

    The heat loss problem experienced through the glass windows could be treated by replacing the glass windows with energy efficient windows that keep heat in. However, this could become a rather expensive project so you would have to weight the costs and benefits.

    Reply

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